Wednesday, May 9, 2012

A Little French Music, Trumpets in Columbus, More

Tomorrow at noon at the museum, Barbara Acker-Mills will split a recital with The Woodfield Trio, of which she is a member with me and cellist Charles Wright. The first half of the program, she'll do Claude Debussy's Reverie and Gabriel Fauré's Dolly Suite, Op. 56. The two composers were contemporaries, technically, though Debussy was a young composer twenty years after Fauré was a young composer. Fauré's music was prescient of the impressionism with which Debussy is identified. If my general knowledge of music history is correct, this is the point where texture and sonorities in music begin to become as important as melody and harmony. What I mean by that is you will hear things in the music that are there as much (or more) because of the noise they make as because of the way they fit into the way melody and harmony were conventionally built at the time.

The link from Debussy's impressionism to Claude Bolling's (born in 1930) Suite for Flute and Piano, the piece that Barbara will play with our trio, is less clear--though still evident--than between Fauré and Debussy. Bolling is a French jazz pianist and bandleader who has written several romantic sounding pieces heavily influenced by jazz. We have played movements of this piece here and there over the last couple of years. But this time we'll present six of the seven movements at one time. This is a free concert, as usual, and there's more about the series and its performers on my Lunch Music Schedule page.

I'll try to do another post about this weekend's jazz events at Piccolo and Ariccia (see below) in Auburn and at The Loft and the Liberty Theatre in Columbus. And hopefully I'll have time to say some about Montgomery Symphony's cello fellow Laura Usiskin's final recital in Montgomery Tuesday, May 15 (fellowship series page).

I mentioned in a recent post about some trumpet activity happening in Columbus at the end of May. I said that Woody Shaw would be performing. He died in 1989, so he won't be performing. His son, Woody Shaw, III, will be lecturing on the legacy of the legendary jazz trumpeter. If you want to go to this or any number of other International Trumpet Guild (website) events during the week of May 22-26, you'll have to register for the conference. Rates are on the website. They range from $210 to $405 for the week and $95 to $135 for a particular day. The schedule is jam-packed and looks great, even if you don't play trumpet.

But you don't have to register for the conference to attend the May 26 concert, Poncho Sanchez and his Latin Big Band featuring Terence Blanchard in the Bill Heard Theater at the RiverCenter in Columbus. You can get $40 tickets at the website for the RiverCenter. Don't miss this one.

UPDATES
 I forgot to mention that Martha's Trouble, a duo whose audio I embedded in my last post, will be playing Thursday (5/10) at Town Creek Park in Auburn as part of the city's May Concert Series (series' news release). The immortal Auburn Knights will perform for the series next Thursday (5/17). Shows are from 6-7:30 PM weather permitting.

Headlining at Piccolo this week will be Jane Drake on Thursday (5/10), Jimmy Johnson on Friday (5/11) and William Hollifield on Saturday (5/12), all shows 8-11 PM. I'm very happy to see Jimmy on the bill. He's a local saxophonist and member of the Auburn Knights who plays mostly alto these days, though he's a very good tenor player as well. I have not seen Hollifield on the schedule before. He's an Atlanta-area native and saxophonist with a good online presence (williamhollifield.com - a bit slow loading pages at the moment). Ariccia will do a Mother's Day jazz brunch Sunday with seatings at 10:30 AM, 12:30 PM and 2:00 PM. Call 344-844-5140 to make a reservation. The Tim Chambliss Jazz Trio will provide the music, so it will be good. UPDATE: Brunch trio will be Columbus's Paul Vaillancourt on drums with Patrick Bruce on guitar and Montgomery pianist Coleman Woodson, III. You sometimes see Tim's name on the bill (as in this case) because he's the go-to guy for great players even if he's not playing.

No comments:

Post a Comment